Group Show

The Age of Ambiguity, Curated by Bob Colacello

Vito Schnabel Gallery - St. Moritz

JAN 29 - MAR 5, 2017

Jean-Michel Basquiat
Untitled, 1981
Acrylic, oil stick, and paper collage on panel
Unframed: 32 1/2 x 14 1/8 inches (82.55 x 35.89 cm); Framed: 48 x 28 x 5 inches (121.92 x 71.12 x 12.7 cm)
© The Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat / ADAGP, Paris / ARS, New York 2017; Private Collection, Florida
Photo by Stefan Altenburger

Reproduction, including downloading of Warhol works is prohibited by copyright laws and international conventions without the express written permission of Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

The Bruce High Quality Foundation
Blind Orion Searching for the Rising Sun, 2015
Oil on canvas
42 1/4 x 62 x 2 1/2 inches (107.315 x 157.48 x 6.35 cm)
© The Bruce High Quality Foundation; Courtesy the Artist and Vito Schnabel Gallery
Photo by Argenis Apolinario

The Bruce High Quality Foundation
Landscape with Travelers Resting, 2015
Oil on canvas
42 1/4 x 62 x 2 1/2 inches (107.315 x 157.48 x 6.35 cm)
© The Bruce High Quality Foundation; Courtesy the Artist and Vito Schnabel Gallery
Photo by Argenis Apolinario

Jeff Elrod
Double Lost Horse, 2016
UV ink on Fisher canvas
72 x 67 x 1 1/4 inches (182.88 x 170.18 x 3.18 cm)
© Jeff Elrod; Courtesy the Artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and Vito Schnabel Gallery
Photo by Argenis Apolinario

Jacqueline Humphries
:):(, 2016
Oil on linen
100 x 111 x 1 1/2 inches (254 x 281.94 x 3.81 cm)
© Jacqueline Humphries; Courtesy the Artist and Greene Naftali, New York
Photo by Jason Mandella

Rashid Johnson
The Crowd, 2016
White ceramic tile, black soap, and wax
73 x 94 1/2 x 2 1/2 inches (185.42 x 240.03 x 6.35 cm)
© Rashid Johnson; Courtesy the Artist and David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles
Photo by Argenis Apolinario

Jeff Koons
Inflatable Flower (Pink), 2000
Mirror-polished stainless steel with transparent color coating
35 1/4 x 18 1/4 inches (89.54 x 46.36 x 1.6 cm)
© Jeff Koons; Courtesy the Artist and Almine Rech Gallery

Adam McEwen
Untitled, 2015
Graphite mounted on aluminum panel
40 inches in diameter (101.6 cm in diameter)
© Adam McEwen; Courtesy the Artist and Art : Concept, Paris 

Sterling Ruby
Head Worker Reconfigured, 2009
Bronze
9 1/4 x 20 x 17 1/2 inches (23.5 x 50.8 x 44.45 cm)
© Sterling Ruby; Courtesy Sterling Ruby Studio and Vito Schnabel Gallery
Photo by Robert Wedemeyer

Sterling Ruby
Alabaster SR11-51, 2011
Acrylic
51 1/2 x 51 1/2 x 2 1/2 inches (130.8 x 130.8 x 6.35 cm)
© Sterling Ruby; Courtesy Sterling Ruby Studio and Vito Schnabel Gallery
Photo by Robert Wedemeyer

Borna Sammak
Untitled, 2016
Heat applied t-shirt graphics on canvas
80 x 64 x 1 1/2 inches (203.2 x 162.56 x 3.81 cm)
© Borna Sammak; Courtesy the Artist and JTT, New York
Photo by Argenis Apolinario

Julian Schnabel
Ascension IV, 2015
Inkjet print, ink, spray paint on polyester
84 x 62 1/2 x 2 inches (213.36 x 158.75 x 5.08 cm)
© Julian Schnabel; Courtesy the Artist and Vito Schnabel Gallery
Photo by Argenis Apolinario

Andy Warhol
Camouflage, 1987
Synthetic polymer and silkscreen ink on canvas
76 x 76 x 2 inches (193.04 x 193.04 x 5.08 cm)
© 2017 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; Private Collection

Reproduction, including downloading of Warhol works is prohibited by copyright laws and international conventions without the express written permission of Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Andy Warhol
Self-Portrait (Fright Wig), 1986
Acrylic and silkscreen ink on canvas
Unframed: 14 x 14 inches (35.56 x 35.56 cm)
Framed: 20 4/5 x 20 4/5 x 1 7/8 inches (52.8 x 52.8 x 4.7 cm)
Photographer: Andrea Kamm
© 2017 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; Private Collection

Reproduction, including downloading of Warhol works is prohibited by copyright laws and international conventions without the express written permission of Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Jonas Wood
Clipping J2, 2015
Oil and acrylic on canvas
88 x 69 x 2 inches (223.52 x 175.26 x 5.08 cm)
© Jonas Wood; Courtesy the Artist
Photo by Brian Forrest

Jonas Wood
Grid Pot 6, 2016
Oil and acrylic on linen
30 x 22 x 1 1/2 inches (76.2 x 55.88 x 3.81 cm)
© Jonas Wood; Courtesy the Artist
Photo by Brian Forrest

Press Release

Vito Schnabel Gallery
Via Maistra 37
7500 St. Moritz, Switzerland
Hours: January 29 – February 5, Daily 11am – 7pm
February 6 – March 5, Wednesday – Sunday 11am – 6pm


Vito Schnabel Gallery is pleased to present The Age of Ambiguity: Abstract Figuration / Figurative Abstraction, a group exhibition that will mark Bob Colacello’s curatorial debut. The show will explore the increasingly blurred lines between abstraction and figuration within the contemporary discourse. Artists include Jean-Michel Basquiat, The Bruce High Quality Foundation, Jeff Elrod, Jacqueline Humphries, Rashid Johnson, Jeff Koons, Adam McEwen, Sterling Ruby, Borna Sammak, Julian Schnabel, Andy Warhol and Jonas Wood.

Colacello writes "As the 21st century grapples its way through its second decade, America seems to have entered what may be called The Age of Ambiguity, a time when everything is fluid and nothing concrete, and confusion overwhelms certainty... It is said that the best artists are the antennae of their society, the prophets of their era. Is it any wonder, then, that many younger American painters and sculptors have long abandoned the bygone absolutisms of Minimalism on one hand and Hyper-Realism on the other and are making works today that hover in a hard to define space that might be called Abstract Figuration or Figurative Abstraction?"

One of the earliest works in the exhibition is Andy Warhol’s 1987 Camouflage, which is simultaneously an abstract pattern picture and a representation of classic military fatigues. Colacello notes that Warhol was constantly searching for a way to make "abstract art that's not really abstract." Similarly, Rashid Johnson's The Crowd fuses the abstract and the figurative to create a contemporary portrait of simultaneous anger and unity. Jacqueline Humphries' :):(, with its grid of hundreds of identical small black boxes covering the entire canvas, like the facade of some endless Orwellian bureaucratic office building or a prison out of Kafka, also seamlessly blends these opposing genres with a haunting result. 


Bob Colacello is an esteemed writer and journalist covering the cultural, social and political spheres as a Special Correspondent at Vanity Fair since 1984. He is well-regarded for his work with Andy Warhol and Interview magazine in the ‘70s and early ‘80s. A year after beginning his career as a film critic at the Village Voice in 1970, Colacello was hired by Warhol and soon became the managing editor and art director of Interview, which he ran until 1983. Colacello became one of Warhol’s closest aides and confidants, helping him write his books, most notably The Philosophy of Andy Warhol: From A to B and Back Again. In 1990, Colacello published a memoir of his years at Warhol’s factory, Holy Terror: Andy Warhol Up Close, which was reissued by Knopf/Vintage Books in 2014.